Can you get Social Security Disability for migraines?

On Behalf of | Apr 25, 2022 | Social Security Disability |

Did you know that the Social Security Blue Book doesn’t specifically list migraines? There are other neurological disorders like seizures listed, but migraines just aren’t there.

For many people, this signals that the Social Security Administration doesn’t consider migraines debilitating, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Even though migraines aren’t included, you can still seek Social Security Disability for migraines if the symptoms are serious enough.

Many people have their claims denied when they first apply for SSDI

Realistically, many people do have their initial claims denied when applying for SSDI. For migraine sufferers, being unable to work and knowing that a denial is possible can be off-putting. Fortunately, you have options and can take steps to minimize the risk of having your application rejected.

To start with, you will need to gather as much information about your condition as possible. This invisible disability may not make you look any different on the outside, but brain scans, like magnetic resonance imaging scans (MRIs) or computerized tomography scans (CT scans) may tell a different story.

Combined with a history of symptoms, these scans can help you show that you are struggling with a disability linked to migraines. If your daily capabilities are limited and your headaches are severe, there is no reason not to try to seek the benefits that you may be entitled to.

According to the American Migraine Foundation, migraines are the second leading cause of disability in the United States. Unfortunately, despite that, the condition isn’t listed as a distinct disability. That doesn’t mean that it doesn’t hurt people’s ability to work or live. The Social Security Administration published a helpful guide to applying for SSDI with migraine in 2019. You can find more information about the way that the Social Security Administration evaluates migraines by reviewing that document.

If you can’t work, you deserve an opportunity to seek the benefits that you need to take care of yourself. Even if you have a condition that is not in the Blue Book, you can still take steps to make a successful disability claim with the SSA.